Tony Hoare Quotes. He specifically said premature optimization; and optimization meant something considerably different back in the days when he made that statement. Motivational Quotes. Origin of "Premature optimization is the root of all evil" Note: It was Tony Hoare who said "Premature optimization is the root of all evil." This famous quote by Sir Tony Hoare (popularized by Donald Knuth) has become a best practice among software engineers. The most common reasons why people optimize things prematurely are that they fail to prioritize their tasks properly, or that the premature optimization represents an easy problem for them to handle, which makes it appealing to take it on even if it’s unnecessary. A. R. Hoare. And that bad design can be even worse than optimisation because it often requires a complete rewrite. A typical premature optimization I encountered a lot of times is doing everything in the same function because of "function call overhead". But I also knew, and forgot, Hoare’s dictum that premature optimization is the root of all evil in programming. Premature optimization is the root of all evil. And look a model like that of React.js, which adds a layer of abstraction, the virtual DOM, which ends up paying massive dividends in performance (especially when combined with immutable data structures). Yet we should not pass up our opportunities in that critical 3%. We should forget about small efficiencies, say about 97% of the time: premature optimization is the root of all evil. – Veedrac Nov 3 '14 at 21:46 ��� David Kra, Fri, 21 Aug 2020 11:05:45 UTC. This is going to be a very short chapter, because the main thing Unix experience teaches us about optimizing for performance is how to know when not to do it. The concept of premature optimization was first made prominent in the field of software engineering. For example, a common guiding principle is the 80/20 rule (also known as the Pareto Principle), which in this case suggests that 80% of the positive outcomes that you experience will come from 20% of the work that you do. Rather, it simply means that you should think carefully before you decide to spend your resources optimizing something. This is not the type of coding you want to do during initial program design, when the code base is rather fluid. The origin of premature optimization The concept of premature optimization was first made prominent in the field of software engineering. So Hoare's comments were on the mark. As computer systems increased in performance from MHz, to hundreds of MHz, to GHz, the performance of computer software has taken a back seat to other concerns. 16 WALLPAPERS 41 POINTS. Knuth refers to it as "Hoare's Dictum" 15 years later in "The Errors of TeX", Software—Practice & Experience 19 :7 (July 1989), pp. Just be careful not to micharacterise the more subtle argument that many people would make against premature optimisation: Making good architecture and clean, de-coupled code a first priority can lead to more performance gains in the long term for multiple reasons, without necessarily sacrificing maintainability or correctness, which is *usually* the primary concern above all others. However, make that invisible to the calling/client program, or at least trivial to add-in later where necessary. It is not a premature optimization to avoid fragile, interpreter-dependant optimizations. Very good article. Yet we should not pass up our opportunities in that critical 3%”. One reason is that it's easier to optimise that 3% of code that is proven to be a performance bottleneck without breaking it. Rather, the important thing is to be aware of these considerations, and use them, at least to some degree, to evaluate tasks when necessary. Isn't it better to just get them running and let Moore's Law take us off the hook when resources are constrained? firmware for a high volume network switch), and domains where it really is not necessary for the programmer to ever think about performance (e.g. Yet we should not pass up our opportunities in that critical 3%. Funny, you don't hear too many computer application users making such statements. We should forget about small efficiencies, say about 97% of the time: premature optimization is the root of all evil.  | PDF. It is attributed to Sir Tony Hoare, though it was popularized by Donald E. Knuth, who said that: “There is no doubt that the holy grail of efficiency leads to abuse. it is great article for all software engineers. I don't think I'm wrong in saying there is a distinction in selecting the right tool for the job versus premature optimization. However, this approach shouldn’t become an excuse to avoid optimization entirely, but should rather serve as a way to prioritize tasks as effectively as possible. Having said that, I agree that most in most domains people should give some thought to performance during the design and throughout development, rather than saving it all of the end. If there will be twice as much memory for the same price in 18 months, why bother to squeeze a factor of 2 from an application's memory requirements? Any coding practice that makes your code harder to understand in the name of performance is a premature optimization. "Premature optimization is the root of all evil" has long been the rallying cry by software engineers to avoid any thought of application performance until the very end of the software development cycle (at which point the optimization phase is typically ignored for economic/time-to-market reasons). Three extracts from the above page: Premature optimization is the root of all evil (or at least most of it) in programming. Premature optimization is the root of all evil. Premature optimization can often end up backfiring, and cause you to waste a lot of resources, such as time, money, and effort, while also increasing the likelihood that you will create future problems. Anyhow, I moved the quote to attributed. Here is the full quote from his book The Art of Computer Programming: A google search for "premature optimization" turns up tens of thousands of hits, most of them quoting Hoare's maxim that premature optimization is the root of all evil.. Though I’ve seen other sites attribute the exact same quote (at least starting with the “We should forget…” part to Sir Tony Hoare. This includes, for example: As noted above, there are some situations where optimizing things early on might be necessary, and in such situations this sort of optimizations are considered appropriate, rather than premature. Indeed, a short essay by Charles Cook ( Premature optimization is problematic because it can cause you to waste resources, to get discouraged, to act when you don’t have enough information, or to get locked into a sub-optimal course of action. Another reason is that using higher level abstractions that might seem very inefficient at first glance can sometimes lead to major optimisations elsewhere. As you can probably tell, this article is not "yet another article warning beginning programmers to avoid premature optimization." But I also knew, and forgot, Hoare’s dictum that premature optimization is the root of all evil in programming. This famous quote by Sir Tony Hoare (popularized by Donald Knuth) has become a best The returned value is the index to the pivot after the partition.) Hopefully, this article can encourage many software engineers to change their views on application performance. - C. A. R. Hoare - often misattributed to D. E. Knuth,who was himself quoting Hoare I was eventually persuaded of the need to design programming notations so as to maximize the number of errors which cannot be made, or if made, can be reliably detected at compile time. It can discourage or frustrate you, especially if your hard work ends up going to waste later. Premature optimization is the root of all evil.--C. “Premature optimization is the root of all evil” is the root of evil. It is unfortunate that Hoare's comments have been twisted to imply that optimization is unnecessary. Something to remember in discussions like this is priorities will differ according to your domain (see Joel Spolsky's "Five Worlds"). Sir Tony Hoare's statement "We should forget about small efficiencies, say about 97% of the time: premature optimization is the root of all evil" has been responsible for a fundamental change in the way software engineers develop applications. There are domains where algorithmic micro-optimisations are important every day (e.g. If the CPU will be twice as fast by then, why bother to shave some running time from a program? チャールズ・アントニー・リチャード・ホーア(Charles Antony Richard Hoare、1934å¹´ 1月11日 - ) は、イギリスの計算機科学者。 通称はトニー・ホーア(Tony Hoare)またはC・A・R・ホーア。. The bloat and unresponsiveness found in many modern applications compels software engineers to reconsider how they apply Hoare's comments to their projects. Premature optimization is the root of all evil in programming. This is crucial, since people often repeat the idea that “premature optimization is the root of all evil”, without acknowledging the full quote, which states that “we should forget about small efficiencies, say about 97% of the time: premature optimization is the root of all evil. Although the quote is often attributed to Donald Knuth, who popularized it, it was Tony Hoare who originally said, “Premature optimization is the root of all evil.” In 1960, he left the Soviet Union and began working at Elli… Spending a lot of resources picking out the best gear possible for a hobby, before you’ve actually started taking part in it. This means that it can be entirely reasonable to assess a situation and decide that you should optimize something, even if it’s at a relatively early stage. I had a 20k rep user today tell me that using a HashSet instead of a List was premature optimization. —C.A.R. The digitally connected world has become a large, swirling sea of information stripped of context. Born in Colombo (Ceylon, now Sri Lanka) to British parents, he received his Bachelor's degree in Classics from the University of Oxford (Merton College) in 1956. Yes, requirements DO change. It can cause you to make mistakes, if you make decisions at a stage where you don’t have enough information. It is attributed to Sir Tony Hoare, though it was popularized by Donald E. Knuth, who said that: “There is no doubt that the holy grail of efficiency leads to abuse. It can cause you to waste resources, such as time, money, and effort, which could be better spent elsewhere. In other words, why bother to optimize programs? An example of this is in using immutable data structures, which you might do mainly to make code easier to reason about, but can end up allowing much more parallelism and other optimisations. People make the mistake of trying to optimize things prematurely in many areas of life. a small company's internal web-app written in 2 weeks and used by 10 people). Remember that this doesn’t mean that you should avoid optimization entirely, but rather that you should think carefully and assess the situation before deciding to move through with a certain optimization. The larger a task appears to be, based on the resources that it will require or the effects that it will have, the warier you should be, and the more you should use these criteria to evaluate it. The quote is a paraphrase of a Donald Knuth quote, one which he has himself attributed to Hoare. “Premature optimization is the root of all evil” is a famous saying among software developers. Great Article! Its source is credited to Donald Knuth. The result is an insanely huge function which is difficult to maintain. So far, we saw what premature optimization is, why it’s an issue, and why people are prone to it. INSPIRATIONAL SUCCESS MOTIVATIONAL. A good programmer will not be lulled into complacency by such reasoning, he will be wise to look carefully at the critical code; but only after that code has been identified.”, — Structured Programming with go to Statements (1974). “Premature optimization is the root of all evil.” is a popular quote with mysterious origins. 100 WALLPAPERS 841464 POINTS. This presents the argument against trying to make premature optimizations, while at the same time acknowledging that it’s nevertheless important to identify areas where optimizations can be necessary, and to then implement those optimizations. Just do what you need at a time ... Everything else is just bullshit. "Premature optimization" is a phrase used to describe a situation where a programmer lets performance considerations affect the design of a piece of code. This is my research area, I think the writer did a great job in drawing the line between what could be avoided and what should never be avoided. ” — Tony Hoare. Hoare was educated in England at the Dragon School in Oxford and the King's School in Canterbury. Inspirational Entrepreneurship Quotes. A google search for "premature optimization" turns up tens of thousands of hits, most of them quoting Hoare's maxim that premature optimization is the root of all evil.. The problem with premature optimization is that you never know in advance where the bottlenecks will be. 7 wallpapers. “ Premature optimization is the root of all evil in programming. Social rather than selfish optimization - Design for many-user throughput at a target response time, rather than optimizing low-load response time for one user. ��� Bharathi Gonala, Wed, 21 May 2014 14:44:05 UTC. In SQL Server 2008 yes - you can convert to date type from datetime. Programmers waste enormous amounts of time thinking about, or worrying about, the speed of noncritical parts of their programs, and these attempts at efficiency actually have a strong negative impact when debugging and maintenance are considered. Ubiquity, Volume 2009 Issue February | BY Randall Hyde, Full citation in the ACM Digital Library This is especially true if a certain ask is relatively minor, since it might take you less time and effort to simply get a trivial 2-minute task done than it is to evaluate it using all of these criteria. However I would argue there is one optimization which, if it is to be done at all, should be enabled at the very start of the project. It is widely attributed to Donald Knuth, who apparently used it in Structured Program with goto Statements but later credits Tony Hoare.. Hoare, however, did not claim it when I … This seems to be the source of the popular attribution to Hoare — a short-circuit of Knuth’s original (uncited) attribution. There are two quicksort partition methods mentioned in Cormen: (the argument A is the array, and [p, r] is the range, inclusive, to perform the partition on.
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